Governor Roy Cooper, Tribes Reach Agreement For NC Sports Betting

  • North Carolina will finally be launching their sports betting market in 2021 after the approval from Governor Roy Cooper amended Tribal Gaming Compacts.
  • An estimated $10 million is expected to be made annually from gambling on sports matchups in the Tar Heel State.
  • Sportsbook locations in North Carolina will be located at both Harrahs’ casinos in the state.

CHARLOTTE, N.C. – After what’s been much longer than written timelines allow, North Carolina Tribal Gaming Compacts were approved by Governor Roy Cooper to include legal sports betting.

Cooper originally legalized sports betting in July of 2019. The bill was written to allow the two casinos in the state-owned by the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI) to expand their businesses with sportsbooks.

Once this was made into law, the EBCI began to work on their end to make the proper amendments to their compacts that would need to be signed off by the Governor.

In October of 2019, the EBCI submitted their new proposal to Cooper, who by law, had 180 days to agree to the terms or ask for changes. His deadline was up in April of 2020 and there was no action taken on the issue.

Since then, the EBCI has been waiting patiently after being left in the wind. Eight months later, on December 3, Governor Cooper finally gave them a response, and a positive one at that, which means legal sports betting in North Carolina will now be able to open up soon.

What Happens Now?

There are still some things that need to happen before the two Harrahs’ properties can move forward with the launch of their sportsbooks. Although Governor Cooper approved of the amendments, he hasn’t put his signature on the documents.

The compacts will require his signature, the signature of the attorney general, and the signature of the secretary of state. But that’s not all.

After the ink is dry by all parties that need to sign, the newly ratified Tribal Gaming Compacts will then be passed over to Washington, D.C. and the Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs. While there, a 45-day public opinion window is necessary by law before Harrah’s can finally open their legal sports betting venues.

News tags: Ann Davis | Certification Commission | Coronavirus pandemic | COVID-19 | Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs | Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians | EBCI | Harrahs | March Madness | NCAA | NFL | North Carolina | Roy Cooper | Super Bowl | Super Bowl 55 | Tribal Gaming Commercial Enterprise | Washington DC

Christina Monroe

Christina has been writing for as long as she can remember and does dedicated research on the newly regulated sports betting market. She comes from a family of sports lovers that engage in friendly bets from time to time. During the winter months, you can find Christina baking cookies and beating the entire staff at Mario Kart…the N64 version of course.

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